truepenny: artist's rendering of Sidneyia inexpectans (Default)
[personal profile] truepenny
Dear Senator Johnson:

I have been reading about the Graham-Cassidy ACA repeal bill, and the more I read, the more horrified I am. The premium hikes it allows for "pre-existing conditions" are unconscionable, and if you don't think Wisconsin will exploit those hikes, you have no understanding of your state's governor. Moreover, it's estimated that 32 million people will lose coverage within 10 years. Remember when you were arguing that 16 million was "better" than 22 million? Because I remember that very clearly.

Senator, this bill is a DISASTER. I am forced to choose between believing that you did not read or understand the bill that you have co-sponsored and believing that you understand it perfectly and just care that little about the well-being of your constituents and the rest of the American people.

Your party's obsession with repealing the ACA has been wasting time, energy, money, and other resources since the beginning of 2017--not to mention the resources and opportunities wasted by your party's childish obstructionism throughout the Obama administration, in which you are fully implicated. Repealing the ACA is fantastically unpopular and has failed repeatedly. And, honestly, the worst thing that could happen to the Republican Party is for this repeal bill to succeed. If it weren't for the catastrophe that would be brought down upon millions of people, I would almost want to let you have this monkey's paw. By all means, Senator. GET WHAT YOU WISH FOR.

However, I would much prefer it if you would join those of your colleagues who are trying to REFORM the ACA, even if you won't go so far as endorsing Medicare for all. In fact, I thought you HAD joined them, since you were participating in hearings about healthcare reform, and I am bitterly disappointed in you (yet again) by your co-sponsorship of the Graham-Cassidy bill.

I know nothing I say will change your mind, and certainly nothing I say will convince you to vote against your own bill. But I cannot remain silent and allow my silence to be counted as consent for this abhorrent, inhumane, and unethical bill. You cannot say you did not know that there was vehement opposition to the Graham-Cassidy bill among your own constituents, to whom, in theory, you are supposed to listen and whose interests, in theory, you are supposed to represent.

I am frankly ashamed to have you as my senator.

Sincerely,
Sarah Monette

Yuletide noms!

Sep. 14th, 2017 06:24 pm
astolat: lady of shalott weaving in black and white (Default)
[personal profile] astolat
They close tomorrow so hurry and get your nominations in!

Mine are:

Witcher: Geralt, Emhyr, Ciri, Dandelion (duh)

Dragonriders of Pern: Menolly, Robinton (I totally want Menolly/Robinton NOT SORRY)

Dune (the book): Paul, Jessica, Stilgar, Feyd -- I don't know exactly what I want here, I think I want some outsider POV on Paul maybe?

My runners-up were:

Rome: Pullo, Vorenus, maybe Octavian -- man, I would love a story that undid what the show did to Octavian in S2 so much

Gladiator: Maximus, Commodus

Brimstone: Ezekiel, The Devil

Dungeons and Dragons Cartoon: Eric, Hank, Sheila, Venger

Battle of the Planets: Mark, Jason

and my perennial hope-springs-eternal Dracula: the Series: Lucard (hope doesn't really spring very far lol)

I am totally not mentioning these here in hopes that someone has a spare nom they wouldn't mind using on one of these. ;)
truepenny: artist's rendering of Sidneyia inexpectans (Default)
[personal profile] truepenny
Dear Senator Johnson:

Today you unveiled your proposed health care legislation. I am not impressed by it, especially in comparison to the health care legislation of Senator Sanders and Senator Baldwin. I know I cannot change your mind, or convince you that removing federal regulations is a catastrophe, not a solution, or that block grants to states, while perhaps a workable solution in some states, will be misused in every way possible in others to ensure that the money does not go where it is most needed. I count Wisconsin as one of those states. I do not believe the state government has its citizens' best interests at heart any more than I believe you do.

Republican senators have been trying and failing to repeal the ACA for all of 2017, despite intense opposition from their constituencies, while Senator Sanders' Medicare for All plan creates the reform you claim to want. You are wasting time, energy, money, and other resources that would be better spent on almost anything else--perhaps the opioid crisis you also claim to be concerned about.

I am disappointed and angry. You have betrayed your constituents again, Senator. And although this is just one more chapter in a book you are making longer by the day, I am still appalled by the stupidity and cruelty you continue to endorse. Even though Wisconsin is not my native state, I have lived and voted here for more than twenty years. I am ashamed that one of my senators has put his name on this bill.


P.S. You still have not made a public statement denouncing fascism, either.

Yuletide nominations are almost over!

Sep. 13th, 2017 10:46 pm
dorinda: Someone writing at a desk while wearing a large helmet with an oxygen tube attached (a device called "The Isolator"). (isolator)
[personal profile] dorinda
I definitely let time get away from me--Yuletide nominations end on Friday! (It actually technically ends at 5am Saturday morning, US Eastern Time, but of course I like to sleep Friday nights, so it'll have to be by bedtime on Friday night.)

Who else has nominated so far?

Only three fandoms, as usual. Hmm.

Okay, looking at the nom self-report spreadsheet, someone says they've nominated Almost Human, including John and Dorian. So that takes a load off my mind! And, happy surprise, someone who isn't me nominated Sinbad (TV), including Sinbad and Gunnar (and others). Whew.

Someone reports having nominated Space: Above and Beyond, which is a delight to hear--but, the characters they nominated were West, Vansen, Hawkes, and Damphousse. Without McQueen in some fashion, it's hard for me to get interested. {{{McQueen}}}

Someone reports having nominated the 1958 movie The Defiant Ones! So good, so upsetting, so slashy. I had a vague story idea for that once upon a time. Not sure I'd be able just to throw myself open to write someone else's request, especially given the historical context and serious racial issues one would perforce have to grapple with, but I'll keep it in mind.

I'm thinking I'll nominate Rejseholdet, since that remains so very rare still (even though I have had some wonderful stories written for me, which I wholeheartedly recommend! I am just also v. greedy. :D ).

Dare I gamble that someone else will nominate Master & Commander? (Or the O'Brian books, though I don't feel as confident when offering to write bookfic, for fear of people requesting het and/or Diana.) Maybe I should, just in case.

For a third, many choices jostle in my head. The Sting, of course, which is a best beloved (and also, being a movie, provides a nice short canon for people in a hurry, whether pinch-hitting or trying something new or whatever. :D). Shetland, though I'm not sure who else wants the kind of stories I'd want to offer/request (Jimmy/Duncan, anyone?)
runpunkrun: dana scully reading jose chung's From Outer Space, text: read (reading)
[personal profile] runpunkrun
Moon Woke Me Up Nine Times: Selected Haiku of Basho, by Bashō Matsuo, translated by David Young: A delightful collection. David Young's introduction is informative and easy to read, which is a rarity in poetry collections and must be praised, though you won't learn a thing about Bashō from it. Young says you can get that everywhere else; instead, the introduction addresses Young's approach to translating these poems, and I was quite surprised at the amount of latitude Young gave himself. Due to the differences between the number of syllables in English and Japanese, he disregards the West's belief that haiku must conform to a 5-7-5 arrangement, which is fine by me, but he also elides cultural references he thought would be lost on English-speaking audiences, reorders the lines themselves, and even removes the occasional question mark, and I don't know how I feel about that. The result is lovely, but is it an honest reflection of Bashō's words?

In Young's hands, Bashō's poetry is clear and simple, each haiku a meditation on life and nature. They are, by turns, longing, playful, soothing, and contemplative, and it's remarkable how many sensory details they include. So much is packed into these little sentences, giving you brief glimpses of another life, transporting you to where Bashō was three hundred years ago, listening to the rain, gardening, or:
Big white leeks
washing them off
feeling how cold
The poetry is transcendent, in that it moved me to a different place. Once I came back, though, I wondered a lot about the choices Young made. I really would have liked some translator's notes (outside of those in the introduction), but instead I'll have to content myself with reading Jane Reichhold's Basho: The Complete Haiku and go over her notes to see how their translations differ. This is actually Young's idea, and he helpfully includes an appendix that correlates his page numbers with Reichhold's numbering system for easy comparison.

Really accessible, and highly recommended.
runpunkrun: dana scully reading jose chung's From Outer Space, text: read (reading)
[personal profile] runpunkrun
Let Them Eat Cake: Classic, Decadent Desserts with Vegan, Gluten-Free & Healthy Variations, by Gesine Bullock-Prado: If this cookbook were an animal, it'd be a platypus. Male platypuses have venomous spurs on their hind feet. Did you know that? But they only produce venom during breeding season, which is between June and October. Their venom isn't lethal to humans, but its effects have been described as "excruciatingly painful."

This cookbook isn't venomous, and instead of excruciatingly painful, it's actually quite delightful. The author's funny, able to admit when she's made a mistake, and is capable of pointing out the problems of palm oil in a non-confrontational way. The book, though, is like if you started out with a beaver, and then someone was like, oh, but what if I can't do buck teeth? And someone else was like, my daughter only likes animals with duckbills. And then suddenly it's laying eggs and has venomous spurs on his heels.

BECAUSE—I swear this made sense when I started out—this book takes a standard, traditional muffin, quick bread, cake, pie, tart, or cookie recipe, and THEN it gives you a vegan variation, a gluten-free variation, and a "healthier" variation, which in this case means a version with a lower glycemic index and more fiber and nutrients. So, like, grapeseed oil instead of butter, and whole wheat or spelt flour rather than white flour.

It's unwieldy. As someone who is currently cooking gluten-free, I'm fine with checking this out of the library, but I'm not going to buy it. I guess if you were experimenting with your diet, or you bake with wheat at home, but need to make things vegan for the people at work, or gluten-free for your in-laws, or more nutritious for the school bake sale—then maybe. The focus is definitely on the traditional recipe, with little boxes afterwards (or on the pages before, the book's not picky or well organized) that explain how to make it vegan, or GF, or healthier by adding egg substitutes or switching out the flours. Sometimes the vegan variation will require an entirely different recipe, which is actually easier to deal with than a paragraph of text about substitutions, so while I might try making the biscuits and scones, I'm going to photocopy the recipe and write in the GF changes myself. Using this as a book would require a lot of flipping back and forth between the main recipe and the variations. I imagine it'd be very easy to make a mistake and put in the wrong amount of something.

So the layout is kind of baroque, but the colors are nice, and almost every recipe has a photo, even if they're sometimes a few pages away from the recipe. I suspect that the photos are of the traditional recipes, though, rather than any of the variants, because I'm a suspicious person by nature, and we all know vegan or gluten-free baked goods don't always look as nice as the traditional versions. Oh, can you merge two variants together and make a vegan gluten-free whatever? Never once brought up by the author. So I'm guessing...try that at your own risk.

If you're interested in cutting down on wheat or animal products, or if you cook for several groups of people with different dietary restrictions, then maybe this is the book for you. If you're straight up vegan and/or gluten-free, I don't see the point. The recipes are pretty standard fare, except for the cake section which is full-on bananas; they involve a lot of layers, if you have the time for that. Measurements are by volume and weight (grams), and there's a helpful introduction to each recipe, but no storage advice, and the index isn't thorough enough for me.
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